Kids’ wildflower meadow from Prince William documentary destroyed by vandals

The remains fo a huge bonfire on what was a pristine wildflower meadow (Image: Backyard Nature/Instagram)

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A meadow that children planted with thousands of wildflowers seeds and featured in a Prince William documentary has been needlessly destroyed by vandals.

The Eco Emeralds, a group of school children from All Saints Catholic Primary School in Anfield, had nurtured their patch of wildflower meadow since launching the nationwide campaign Backyard Nature in 2019.

Their greenspace had featured recently in ITV documentary ‘Prince William: A Planet for Us’ and the group had planted other wildflower meadows across Liverpool, In Your Area reports.

The film showed how they transformed part of Thirlmere Park, the nearest big green space to the school, by planting a mix of wildflowers.

The children even named a bug hotel 'Bugingham Palace' in honour of the Royal visit.

The aftermath of Bonfire Night at the site
(Image: Backyard Nature/Instagram)

The children featured in a recent documentary filmed by Prince William
(Image: REUTERS)

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But tragically the park trashed over the Bonfire Night weekend, despite pleas for the meadow to be respected.

Pictures show the once-pristine park covered in messy rubbish and the remains of a huge bonfire.

Fortunately 'Bugingham Palace' is still standing
(Image: Backyard Nature/Instagram)

A charred shopping trolley can be seen in the ashes of the blaze.

The school says that some trees were also damaged by fire. 

Devastated teachers and pupils have set up a GoFundMe page to help repair the damage and sort out the replanting of the area for next year.

Teacher Matthew Farrell said: "As everyone is aware, 2020 has been a very difficult year. 

“The wildflowers planted in Thirlmere Park were wonderful. The Eco Emeralds had specifically chosen that patch as it was local to the school and needed to be brightened up.

Children building 'Bugingham Palace'
(Image: Grabs ITV)

“The childrens' efforts have been admired locally, nationally and internationally; the Duchess of Cambridge became aware of the work of the children which led to Prince William coming to visit the children.”

Nell, co-founder of Eco Emeralds said:  "We're really devastated. Please help us by doing a tiny bit for your community.  Our school and community and the Eco Emeralds have worked really hard planting those seeds including the youngest in the school in nursery."

You can donate by visiting the GoFundMe page here.