Sore loser Donald Trump drops first hint that he won’t be President much longer

Video LoadingVideo UnavailableClick to playTap to playThe video will start in8CancelPlay now

Our free email newsletter sends you the biggest headlines from news, sport and showbiz

Sign upWhen you subscribe we will use the information you provide to send you these newsletters. Sometimes they’ll include recommendations for other related newsletters or services we offer. OurPrivacy Noticeexplains more about how we use your data, and your rights. You can unsubscribe at any time.Thank you for subscribingWe have more newslettersShow meSee ourprivacy noticeInvalid Email

Deluded Donald Trump has dropped his first hint that he will not be President for much longer.

In a speech at the White House, he said his administration will not bring in another lockdown – but said "time will tell" who will be in charge after January.

It comes after more than a week of making baseless claims that last week's election was rigged, without producing any evidence.

Now, it appears, he may have finally realised the game is up, as he faces mounting pressure to concede to President-Elect Joe Biden.

"Whatever happens in the future, who knows which administration it will be," he said, "I guess time will tell.”

But in his first public speech in a week, the outgoing US President stopped short of throwing in the towel – instead saying his administration would not sanction another lockdown.

The petulant President continues to refer to Covid-19 as "China virus"
(Image: REUTERS)

Read More
Related Articles


  • Joe Biden 'won't make US-UK trade deal a priority' in his first 100 days

Read More
Related Articles


  • Wales coronavirus cases have fallen after 'firebreak' lockdown sparking hope

He bragged about drug firm Pfizer's vaccine breakthrough, claiming credit for the speed of the discovery.

Trump said without evidence that it would have taken up to five times longer if someone else was in the White House.

The US President – who continued to refer to Covid-19 as the "China virus" said: "No medical breakthrough of this scope and magnitude has been achieved this rapidly."

He added that the breakthrough – which this week saw the drug company announce its vaccine was 99% effective – was "unparalleled".

"It will be approved very very quickly," he pledged.

"If you had a different administration what we've achieved would have taken three or four years," he added.

Donald Trump has said there will be no lockdowns under his administration
(Image: White House)

But he escalated his feud with New York Governor Andrew Cuomo, saying the vaccine would not be available in New York State, following opposition by the Democrat.

Trump said: "We won't be delivering it to New York State until we have authorisation to do that, and it pains me to say that."

Mr Cuomo has previously said that he would not allow the vaccine to be distributed until Mr Biden takes over.

Joe Biden earlier said that the Trump administration needs to get a grip on the crisis
(Image: REUTERS)

Read More
Related Articles


  • How Joe Biden's presidency could spell trouble down the road for Boris Johnson

Read More
Related Articles


  • White House assuming second Donald Trump term will take place says trade advisor

Trump has previously accused health authorities of holding back the announcement that a vaccine is on the horizon, costing him the election.

Earlier today the man who defeated him, Joe Biden, said in a statement: "I am the president-elect, but I will not be president until next year.

"The crisis does not respect dates on the calendar…

"Urgent action is needed today, now, by the current administration – starting with an acknowledgment of how serious the current situation is."

Skyrocketing infections could add more than 8 million more cases and 70,000 deaths before January 20, according to Reuters calculations.

The only ways to change the outcome, experts said, are for President Donald Trump's outgoing administration to alter its strategy or state governments to introduce stricter and more coordinated measures.

Colder weather adds to the challenge.

"The epidemic is going to be worse than it was in the spring, and worse than it was for the everyday American," said Gregg Gonsalves, a professor in epidemiology at Yale University and a health care activist.