Why is it Euro 2020 and not Euro 2021? UEFA decision to stick with branding explained

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After a gruelling 12-month delay, Europe's continental competition is set to commence on Friday with Italy and Turkey locking horns at the Stadio Olimpico in Rome.

The anniversary event hosted by 11 nations across Europe was due to take place last year.

However, Covid-19 restrictions meant UEFA were forced to delay proceedings and postpone the tournament in order to ensure the safety of players and fans.

And that year-long wait has only made supporters more excited for the tournament.

With 24 of Europe's best teams set to do battle against one another, Euro 2020 promises to be a classic. But just why is the tournament called Euro 2020 and not 2021?

Pictured above is UEFA president Aleksander Ceferin.
(Image: Richard Juilliart – UEFA/UEFA via Getty Images)

Why is Euro 2020 not called Euro 2021?

Well ahead of the curtain raiser, UEFA already decided to continue calling the tournament Euro 2020 and not Euro 2021 for various reasons. Their initial explanation read along the lines of: "To keep the vision of the competition."

However, there is a little more to it than a catchy slogan.

By the time the devastating Covid-19 pandemic had spread, UEFA had already prepared and manufactured a lot of branding and merchandising ahead of the tournament, which of course had the original Euro 2020 logo on it.

In order to save having to go through the financial burden of reprinting and sending all the Euro 2020 merchandise to waste, it made sense to stick with the original Euro 2020 name – even if it may cause some confusion to fans.

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UEFA have since confirmed that in an official statement.

It read: "This choice is in line with UEFA's commitment to make UEFA Euro 2020 sustainable and not to generate additional amounts of waste.

"A lot of branded material had already been produced by the time of the tournament's postponement. A name change for the event would have meant the destruction and reproduction of such items."

There are, meanwhile, other reasons for keeping the original name.

How far do you think England will go at Euro 2020? Let us know in the comments section below.

Wembley Stadium will host the Euro 2020 final on Sunday, July 11.
(Image: Marc Atkins – The FA/The FA via Getty Images)

Indeed, UEFA have subsequently claimed this decision was in order to remember and commemorate the draining and 'difficult' 2020 period that Europe (and the entire world) had to encounter last year.

Barring a few rare football purists, fans are unlikely to be impacted or too angry by UEFA's decision.

The month-long tournament promises plenty of excitement and drama – so any lingering confusion over the name will quickly dissipate, you would expect.

England are one of the favourites for the competition, too, with Gareth Southgate's men set to play most of their games at Wembley Stadium.

As a result of the delay, fans are allowed back into venues in time for Euro 2020.

If restrictions in the UK ease on the June 21, according to current government plans, there is the possibility of a full crowd at Wembley the following day against the Czech Republic, which could be a major boost for Southgate and his international hopefuls.

Ultimately, after a bleak year, Euro 2020 in 2021 has the potential to bring smiles to every face across the continent.

What are you most looking forward to about Euro 2020? Have your say below.

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