Met Commissioner denies the Met is ‘institutionally corrupt’ 

The Metropolitan Police commissioner has rejected claims the force is “institutionally corrupt” and has denied delaying the work of the inquiry into the murder of Daniel Morgan.

Dame Cressida Dick faced calls to resign after a damning report accused Scotland Yard of putting its own reputation ahead of solving the brutal 1987 killing of the private detective.

She was accused of deliberately frustrating the work of the independent panel set up to look into the murder by refusing to hand over documents and material in a timely fashion.

But hitting back at the allegations contained in the 1,200 page report, Dame Cressida rejected the central findings of the panel and said she had no intention of resigning.

She said: “I don’t believe we are institutionally corrupt. I don’t accept that.”

She went on: "I didn’t obstruct their work. I set out with my team, who were well resourced, to ensure that we gave the panel maximum cooperation, and that we did full disclosure, as quickly as we could.

"I look back and know that I acted with integrity, and that I was at all times trying to fulfil my duty there to the family and to the panel.”

Dame Cressida said the Met was determined to learn any lessons from the report but added: “I have no intention of resigning."

But Raju Bhatt, solicitor for the Morgan family, said the Met’s response showed that they had still not learned from the mistakes of the past.

He said: "This illustrates perfectly what the report was stating that there is a refusal in the Met to accept the reality that has been presented. 

"The panel could not have been starker. You can see the mindset that the family has had to deal with for the past 34-years.

"Cressida Dick must be living in a parallel universe to the one that the panel and the family have been living in."

Dame Cressida Dick has denied claims that the force is institutionally corrupt

It has also emerged that Scotland Yard could now be facing a huge compensation claim from the family of Mr Morgan.

His brother, Alistair, who has led a 34-year campaign for justice, said dealing with the Met had been an "absolute nightmare" and confirmed he was in talks with his lawyers about suing the Met.

Experts believe the family could be in line for a seven figure payout following their lengthy ordeal at the hands of the country’s biggest force.

Any big compensation settlement will heap more pressure on Dame Cressida Dick, after the Met was recently forced to payout more than £1 million to the victims of the Operation Midland fiasco. 

Mr Morgan, a father of two, and private investigator, was found dead in a pub car park in March 1987.

Despite four separate police investigations nobody has ever been brought to justice for the brutal killing.

Tuesday’s damning report concluded that widespread corruption within the force had fatally undermined the original murder investigation and that it had then been repeatedly covered up.

Asked if he would be seeking damages from the Met, Mr Morgan said he was still going through the 1,200 page report, but added: "It is absolutely true that they have made our lives hell over three decades. 

"Dealing with them has been an absolute nightmare and it has deflected me from all kinds of other activities that I would have liked to have pursued. 

"It has really affected my family and my life and I will be looking at this report and talking to my solicitor and I will be considering the position in that respect."

One legal expert said the report could pave the way for one of the biggest legal actions the Met had faced for years.

Harvey Proctor, the former Tory MP, who lost his home and job, eventually received £900,000 in damages and costs after being investigated by the police over false allegations of child abuse.

He said: "My message to the Met is not to delay in paying. Do not do what they did in my case and deny any responsibility. Save public money by not going to the QCs.

"Rather than waiting for the Morgan family to come to you, pay them now. Take the initiative and gain some self respect from another disastrous set of events."

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